Here is the powerpoint I prepared for the curator; Elizabeth Bates in 2005 after she invited me to fill the ‘study drawers’ at the Museum of Brisbane Tuesday, Dec 6 2016 

My ephemera collection (and associated memory) was given a super public display of affection at the time . . . and then yesterday Jo Hoban from thedesignfiles visited the studio fleshing out her cover story on 1) our home, 2) our studio and 3) our working collaborations – soon to be featured. Jo wondered, like I have often mused – why more opportunities are not forthcoming to show off lost pieces of personal history. At least one more visitor has mined my archive. The powerpoint is downloadable – here.

Malcolm’s selection of local folk art from his urban_archaeology collection – a submission to the curators at the Ipswich Art Gallery. Tuesday, Aug 12 2008 

The advert in the local antiques guide said – “more please”, the Ipswich Art Gallery is developing Queensland Folk Art; an exhibition to be presented in June 2009 as part of Queensland’s sesquicentenary. The gallery is seeking fine examples of the following items of Queensland orign for research, publication and loan: Tramp Art, Scrimshaw, Carving, Leatherwork,Wattlework & Patchwork.

The powerpoint created shows 68 items selected from many hundreds more in cabinets and boxes around the house and studio. Michael Beckman asked for these to share with Glenn Cooke and other curators working on the show. So if you have anything  that you feel is local and worthy, give them a call + 61 7 3810 7222 or an email to <info@ipswichartgallery.qld.gov.au>

NOTE: the powerpoint is 37.71Mb, either be patient & view in the browser or go to the viewer site to download- http://www.co-opones.to/male/viewer/images/malE-somefolk_AA.ppt

Juan-luis’ day book as inspected by the QAG curators today Friday, Jul 15 2005 

Barbara’s master-jeweller, Juan-luis Gonzalez was quizzed about his role in the everyday makes as part of the curators process in preparing their take on Jeweller to the Lost affairs, leading to their forthcoming show. Juan’s documentation is housed in his daily dairies, they are the basis of his timesheets and are full of the most intimate one-offs, reminders of his process and Barbara’s instructions. The curators; Julie Ewington, Amelia Gundelach and Ian Weir their editor scanned various volumes, mal E scanned this one as his favourite. Here Juan has impressed a component still hot from soldering and burnt its impression into the page – so playful, so serious!

We are now able to share with clients and friends, our sculpture in Cbus’ new building at 1 William Street Brisbane Friday, Oct 28 2016 

This public art project has been under wraps since 2014, we were one of fifty-four artists to tender an EOI (expression of interest) then one of eight shortlisted. Three made the final cut to have their concepts accepted and be allocated a location. Our work was to be located in the magnificent 10 metre high foyer.

We collaborated throughout with curator; Jacqueline Armitstead, architect; Mark Damant, engineers; Rod Bligh and Simon Lewis, fabricators; Dee Wallace and John Edwards at G&B Stainless. Installation day in September 2016 went perfectly and our group of three works entitled: ‘New Nature’ has already drawn considerable attention and positive reaction from our client and building visitors.

The scale model for #3 is shown on the polished stainless steel light well, beside the spiral strip prior to being tacked to the vector cut spine. All three sculpture elements are laid out for production sheets here, here and here. Each unit in elevation is here, here, and here.

Two of Barbara’s elements on model #2 showing the different materials and treatments she has designed and specified to emulate nature, below and above ground.

number1-b

This secure and technologically smart building will house the office of the Queensland Premier, the Queensland Cabinet and parliamentary bureaucrats. The ground floor and foyer are all considered public spaces so do drop in and coffee-up under this last shot above, of model #3.

The Neville Bonner building is being demolished to make way for the new Queen’s Wharf precinct Wednesday, May 4 2016 

bh-net-buildingdemo

After only 16 years of life, multiple architectural awards, our site-specific sculpture entitled ‘net’ and many other public artworks in situ are now in limbo. Although owned by the Queensland Government we do have artist’s moral rights to the work. We do have a say as to its future use and placement when that time comes. Our original curator, Jacqueline Armitstead is working on every artist’s behalf at this time to see a legitimate outcome for all the artworks.

The building’s demise as reported:

Name tower of power after Neville Bonner:

The LNP Opposition has a Labor ally in Curtis Pitt. But only when it comes to continuing to honour the nation’s first indigenous person to become a member of the federal parliament. Neville Bonner, an elder of the Jagera people, became the first indigenous Senator in 1971 when he was chosen to fill a casual Liberal vacancy, and the first indigenous Senator to be elected in their own right by popular vote in 1972 up until 1980, finishing up in the Senate in 1983 as an independent.  In 1999 the award-winning Neville Bonner building was officially opened. It houses the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services. Come 2017 it is slated for demolition as part of the Queens Wharf precinct along with the Executive Building and the next door Public Works building. The federal electorate of Bonner was named for the state’s groundbreaking politician in 2004, but Opposition state development spokesman Tim Nicholls said Mr Bonner deserved further recognition.

“When we see the demolition of the old Neville Bonner building, that 1 William Street, which of course is the catalyst for this development, being renamed perhaps the Neville Bonner building in honour of a great Liberal Senator, the first indigenous Liberal Senator coming from Queensland,” he said. And Treasurer Curtis Pitt, who holds the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships portfolio, agreed. “I think people across all sides of politics have the greatest respect for Neville Bonner and in fact, I myself got to serve as the Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander partnerships in the Neville Bonner building and have my office there – it certainly wasn’t lost on me the significance of that,” he said. “Given that the Neville Bonner building will be demolished as part of the overall re-development in terms of Queen’s Wharf, clearly there is going to need to be some recognition, on-going, of Mr Bonner’s great contribution to public life in Queensland. “Of course, it is not a decision that I can make, but I, of course, like many people, want to see that legacy that he has left in Queensland is recognised in some way going forward. “Mr Bonner’s great-niece, Queensland Senator Joanna Lindgren, said her late uncle would have approved of the progress represented by the Queens Wharf development. “The building named after him, that currently stands in the Queens Wharf precinct is from another generation and Uncle Neville would be the first to say that progress is needed,” Senator Lindgren said. “I would be very honoured if the new executive building is named in his memory, and I am also very pleased that with the removal of the old building, a great initiative of redevelopment and job creation implemented by the former LNP government can commence. “1 William Street, nicknamed the “tower of power”, is still without an official name.  The government and larger public service departments are due to move in next year, with the building scheduled for completion at the end of 2016. BRISBANE TIMES JULY 2015

The future as envisioned in (1), (2), (3) and (4) renderings. The architectural fraternity is quite polarised by this proposal, it will see one of our earliest colonial buildings entirely covered by street  scape.

Received an email from a long-time friend and client in Sydney this morning: Thursday, Mar 31 2016 

Begin forwarded message:
From: JG <removed email address>
Subject: Princess ring
Date: 31 March 2016 8:50:47 AM AEST

Hi Barby and Mal

Today, 21 years ago I received the beautiful princess ring!

I still love it

Joanna xx

……………………………………..
4148-37
Selected by the curators for inclusion in the Queensland Art Gallery show and catalogue and reproduced on page 64 – entitled “Indian Princess Ring” commissioned c1995 was (cat.38) item in the show. Pear cut Tsavorite Garnet, pink Sapphires and Diamonds 18ct carved Yellow Gold – 2.1 x 2.1 x 1.7cm – QAG scan given to the studio above.
Below is my original scan and preparation from 21 years ago:
bh-greenwoodprincess-olderscan

 

We are very proud of this work, I’ve just found this review in ArchitectureAu Friday, Nov 21 2014 

These seven pages cover every artist in this note-worthy exhibition. I just found this review by Margie Fraser which has thus far escaped my attention. –  here. 

Link to the concept

Link to the work

Link to the show

Our work in ‘Ipswich Houses’ had another airing February this year at Artisan when the curators borrowed this work from the Ipswich Art Gallery.

bh-chainreaction-b

 

Eighteen slides for 2013 Mercedes Fashion Week – a cascading history shots from Barbara’s Brisbane archive Thursday, Jun 6 2013 

These are what we have prepared and supplied to the curators and facilitators, it is up to them what they include and use . . . we hope these whet your appetite for the group discussion in August. Enjoy and follow the links already posted for the other exciting activities scheduled.

ABOVE: 1985 Photo credits – Barbara Heath (Anna Bourke with Barbara Heath)

ABOVE: 1986 Photo credits – Barbara Heath (Barbara Heath with Leigh Cholakis)

ABOVE: 1990 Photo credits – Malcolm Enright

ABOVE: 1998 Photo credits – ‘Net’ Christopher Hemmings  – 1999 ‘a tree a rock a cloud’ David Sandison

ABOVE: 1991 Photo credits – Malcolm Enright (design and realisation)

ABOVE: 1992 Photo credits – Peter Budd

ABOVE: 1993 Photo credits – Malcolm Enright (design and realisation)

ABOVE: 1997 Photo credits – Peter Budd

ABOVE: 1987 Photo credits – Andrew Campbell

ABOVE: 1989 Photo credits – Lehan Ramsay

ABOVE: 1998 Photo credits – Peter Budd

ABOVE: 1989 Photo credits – Monty Coles

ABOVE: 1995 Photo credits – Quenten Bacon

ABOVE: 1999 Photo credits – Guy Heritage

ABOVE: 1990 Photo credits – Warwick Orme

ABOVE: 1987 Photo credits – Peter Kent – Malcolm Enright

ABOVE: 2007 Photo credits – Barbara Heath

ABOVE: 2007 Photo credits – Barbara Heath

 

I’ve just updated Barbara’s c.v. for 2013 as she has a gig at Mercedes Fashion Week in August Wednesday, Jun 5 2013 

The session info and link is here – “A conversation about – Queensland Style” and how it translates across disciplines, should be interesting. The text blurb: Tuesday 27, 7.30pm / SLQ Auditorium 1, level 2, State Library of QLD, South Bank / Free Admission.
Join fashion curator Nadia Buick with artist Michael Zavros, architect Stephen Cameron, academic Dr Courtney Pedersen, and “jeweller to the lost” Barbara Heath for a conversation about the aesthetics, themes and distinctiveness (or lack of) in Queensland’s sub-tropical design.

You will find the link to Barbara’s c.v. top left corner in our pages section . . .

Everything happens in twos it seems (inseparables), well Glenn Cooke owned the last post and yesterday he collected his latest two commissioned rings by Barbara Thursday, May 9 2013 

One of Barbara’s earliest sets of stacked interlocking rings was purchased at a Cintra House exhibition by Glenn Cooke, who was the decorative arts curator at the Queensland Art Gallery. ‘Cook-e’ has been a friend and supporter of us both and also we share many interests, Australiana: furniture and gold & silversmithing, chip art, tea towel art, matchstick art and found ephemera plus we are all members of the Australian Garden History Society. His third commission is featured today.

Next Page »