bh-net-buildingdemo

After only 16 years of life, multiple architectural awards, our site-specific sculpture entitled ‘net’ and many other public artworks in situ are now in limbo. Although owned by the Queensland Government we do have artist’s moral rights to the work. We do have a say as to its future use and placement when that time comes. Our original curator, Jacqueline Armitstead is working on every artist’s behalf at this time to see a legitimate outcome for all the artworks.

The building’s demise as reported:

Name tower of power after Neville Bonner:

The LNP Opposition has a Labor ally in Curtis Pitt. But only when it comes to continuing to honour the nation’s first indigenous person to become a member of the federal parliament. Neville Bonner, an elder of the Jagera people, became the first indigenous Senator in 1971 when he was chosen to fill a casual Liberal vacancy, and the first indigenous Senator to be elected in their own right by popular vote in 1972 up until 1980, finishing up in the Senate in 1983 as an independent.  In 1999 the award-winning Neville Bonner building was officially opened. It houses the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services. Come 2017 it is slated for demolition as part of the Queens Wharf precinct along with the Executive Building and the next door Public Works building. The federal electorate of Bonner was named for the state’s groundbreaking politician in 2004, but Opposition state development spokesman Tim Nicholls said Mr Bonner deserved further recognition.

“When we see the demolition of the old Neville Bonner building, that 1 William Street, which of course is the catalyst for this development, being renamed perhaps the Neville Bonner building in honour of a great Liberal Senator, the first indigenous Liberal Senator coming from Queensland,” he said. And Treasurer Curtis Pitt, who holds the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships portfolio, agreed. “I think people across all sides of politics have the greatest respect for Neville Bonner and in fact, I myself got to serve as the Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander partnerships in the Neville Bonner building and have my office there – it certainly wasn’t lost on me the significance of that,” he said. “Given that the Neville Bonner building will be demolished as part of the overall re-development in terms of Queen’s Wharf, clearly there is going to need to be some recognition, on-going, of Mr Bonner’s great contribution to public life in Queensland. “Of course, it is not a decision that I can make, but I, of course, like many people, want to see that legacy that he has left in Queensland is recognised in some way going forward. “Mr Bonner’s great-niece, Queensland Senator Joanna Lindgren, said her late uncle would have approved of the progress represented by the Queens Wharf development. “The building named after him, that currently stands in the Queens Wharf precinct is from another generation and Uncle Neville would be the first to say that progress is needed,” Senator Lindgren said. “I would be very honoured if the new executive building is named in his memory, and I am also very pleased that with the removal of the old building, a great initiative of redevelopment and job creation implemented by the former LNP government can commence. “1 William Street, nicknamed the “tower of power”, is still without an official name.  The government and larger public service departments are due to move in next year, with the building scheduled for completion at the end of 2016. BRISBANE TIMES JULY 2015

The future as envisioned in (1), (2), (3) and (4) renderings. The architectural fraternity is quite polarised by this proposal, it will see one of our earliest colonial buildings entirely covered by street  scape.

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