We love the Brisbane City Council’s continued development and resources allocation to this public place – especially the public art & sculpture . . . we are both members of the Australian Garden History Society (link) as well so we applaud Australia Post for their recent stamp series. This is the first one that I’ve seen, I’m just hanging out to see if they have covered some of the contemporary artworks as well? Scott Redford’s stainless steel ROCK for instance and Rhyl Hinwood’s fantastic carved and coloured Helidon sandstone seat for starters.

As an aside – The AGHS Queensland Chapter’s next meeting, this Saturday will be a treat, we love John Slaughter’s wit and energy – not to be missed everyone!

The Gothic Revival  a Curious Tale.
Presented by John Slaughter
John’s talk finds the beginnings of the Gothic Revival movement in the English garden, gradually taking over from the Classical in the 18th C.
Gardens or estates with the ruins of old Gothic buildings, erected in medieval times, used these to create landscape effects and emotional responses which were quite different from those of the Classical temples and bridges.
John will trace how these garden design movements lead to the construction of new buildings in the Gothic style and so to the Gothic Revival, which has had such a great impact on art, architecture and culture generally.
Gothic Revival was at its peak in the 19C but traces of it can be found in the 21C, and John will comment on evidence of the style in Brisbane.
There were some unusual and interesting people associated with the movement and John will tell the story of some of these.
John is an entertaining presenter and has many pictures to illustrate his story.
Where:  the Herbarium conference room, Brisbane Botanical Gardens, Mt Coot-tha.
Time:   2.00 pm on Saturday 5th September.
Costs:  $10 for members and $15 for visitors.
Afternoon tea will be served.
RSVP:  Gil Jorgensen on 3341 3933 or jorgenkj@picknowl.com.au

The Gothic Revival  a Curious Tale – Presented by John Slaughter

John’s talk finds the beginnings of the Gothic Revival movement in the English garden, gradually taking over from the Classical in the 18th C. Gardens or estates with the ruins of old Gothic buildings, erected in medieval times, used these to create landscape effects and emotional responses which were quite different from those of the Classical temples and bridges. John will trace how these garden design movements lead to the construction of new buildings in the Gothic style and so to the Gothic Revival, which has had such a great impact on art, architecture and culture generally. Gothic Revival was at its peak in the 19C but traces of it can be found in the 21C, and John will comment on evidence of the style in Brisbane. There were some unusual and interesting people associated with the movement and John will tell the story of some of these. John is an entertaining presenter and has many pictures to illustrate his story.

Where:  the Herbarium conference room, Brisbane Botanical Gardens, Mt Coot-tha.

Time:   2.00 pm on Saturday 5th September.

Costs:  $10 for members and $15 for visitors.

Afternoon tea will be served.

RSVP:  Gil Jorgensen on 3341 3933 or jorgenkj@picknowl.com.au

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The following day, Friday September 4 2009 – update:

Another stamp in the series arrived in the post today! . . . and pictured below is a sandstone memorial I’m well aware of . . . erected by public subscription in 1853 to the memory of William Bedford.  Here is my shot taken in 1987

. . . but this is old Hobart, St David’s Park just up from Salamanca Place and I was going to say that there is absolutely nothing contemporary in the park or vicinity. Then I realised that the eastern side of the park runs into the nice modern Supreme Court building from the 1960s.

The winding wall between St David’s and the court precinct has been punctuated with reclaimed tombstones placed in a readable but random way. The names, dates and particularly the epitaphs I found worthy of photographs and quite thoughts – especially one with Barbara’s Father’s surname although that family say there’s no connection. Barbara’s Mothers side is also set into stone in the form of commemorative bricks to her two convict ancestors in Campbell Town – here.

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