Thinking about the state of Susie Hansen’s mural at La Trobe Terrace Paddington Wednesday, Jul 30 2014 

Plants are now trailing down from the top and lichen is now covering a great mass of the paintwork.

I have posted on this before and recently it has been up on FaceBook with comments and suggestions that we should all create a working bee and “clean it up”, what do you think Susie? . . . what does HandsOnArt think?

Three shots of an object we commissioned from Shanna Muston Tuesday, Dec 24 2013 

Shanna was successful in her ‘art start’ grant proposal, early in 2013. Both Barbara and I mentored her in all aspects of her business / jewellery start up. We have been mates for quite some time now and have followed her work. The piece of wood we gave Shanna is from our old store in Tunbridge, Tasmania. Water etched and with traces of old paint, this piece if timber fits with her aesthetic, beautifully. We thought that some of the grant fee we earned should be put back into Shanna’s own practice so we commissioned an object in response to the timber piece. It was delivered last week but we still have no idea about her title, we shall all wait for a comment + feedback. Between us, we have wonderful examples of local jewellers work. In fact we have pieces buy everyone who has ever spent studio time with us over the years.

Another ‘thank-you’ card from lovely recent clients Tuesday, Nov 12 2013 

. . . to be filed with their job bag and placed in the commissioner’s year 2013 folder. I have it out typing all the new clients’ details into the database for the ‘jeweller to the lost’ annual report and studio sale notice that we produce every year.

We love the fan/thanks mail that we receive and we both treasure and preserve them, Dr Gael sends the most divine cards Thursday, May 2 2013 

mensbuttons2

This is a found Leaf Lattice pattern, yoni multiplied (maybe this a circle graphic more suitable to ephemeral-male)? Friday, May 4 2012 

I’m not convinced the title is as worthy as it sounds but hey, this guy might be very young. He has obviously figured out something based on the holy yoni shape. A roughly coloured version is here, thanks Roman.

The first ‘touring’ Tinsmith show’s invite for everyone – take notice of the dates and address Tuesday, Jan 24 2012 

Some readers will join the dots, my NAWCC Clock Chapter 104 held a watch and clock display at Pine Rivers a while back and we are now venturing out there again for the touring Tinsmith show in Feb 2012. Barbara’s artist talk is on the 10th at 6:00pm for 6:30pm. The hard cover catalogue is being printed in Hong Kong at the moment, will be interesting to see it as we have not been shown any proofs – the show is really out of our hands now. We have great faith in the touring body and Artisan and warmly invite all of you to venture a little north for the show. The Pine Rivers Heritage Museum is a great venue and holds the Roy Copper Clock Collection as well as a terrific static folk art and object show from the local catchment.

Free (downloadable) tickets to the opening of the LiBrisFair in Brisbane, Friday 16th September 2011 Thursday, Sep 8 2011 

Fine, beautiful and rare books, prints, maps, photographs, manuscripts & ephemera with prices to suit all budgets. History, Literature, Art, Natural History, Sport, Military, Queensland History and the flyer says much more – the erotica will probably be under the counter. This is the first event organised by our friend, Jorn Harbeck who has pulled together 15 other antiquarian booksellers from around Australia, including “Novel Lines Bookshop” at Brisbane’s Paddington run by another client and friend – Anne Jolly. The tickets are here to download and print out, further information supplied if you email him direct <books@harbeck.com.au> The venue is at the State Library of Queensland, The Studio (Level One), Stanley Place, Brisbane.

 

Tinsmith: An Ordinary Romance – the small version of the catalogue to download Wednesday, Sep 22 2010 

The 16 page catalogue is at the printers, it will be on-sale at Artisan from the opening night of October 7 2010. The small (2Mb) .pdf version can be downloaded here. Researched, designed, photographed and produced in-house at Jeweller to the Lost. Prepress and print by David Darling at D&D Colour.

Almost the last Tinsmith post – local retailer’s catalogues in Mal’s ephemera collection Tuesday, Aug 24 2010 

The Smellie & Co building down the bottom of Edward street is now a listed landmark building. I walked past it each day on the way to my studio at Metro Arts further up Edward Street when I first arrived in Brisbane. The facade is fabulously endowed with locally made rich earthy bricks, this was both a manufacturing and retailing enterprise and a large business in 19th century Brisbane. I remember an early cedar and iron ‘corn husker’ with all the original Smellie graphics on the verandah at Lansdowne Street when I first met Mal. Three items marked with white asterisks (above) could well have been made in Brisbane c1880s.

Another early colonial retailer was Whincup & Co in the Valley. This saddle stitched catalogue is a reminder of the forgotten retail clutter provided by those early suppliers. We believe this firm was situated where the old Walton’s Building still stands, Cnr Brunswick and Wickham Streets – here’s the full page .pdf (9.7Mb) with an additional three pieces of ‘collectable’ Seagrass Furniture.

Wunderlich Patent Ceiling & Roof Company, Sydney produced press tin ceiling tiles and all the decorating options including wall linings, stair and dado panels, perforated centre-flowers which were quite the thing at the Turn of the Century. We have three different catalogues that certainly present a pictorial record of the industrial advancement of tinsmithing, once materials and machines were applied with design and marketing input. Here are three .pdfs of pages, (1) is of Fishscale Tiles, (2) and (3) show finials in place on rooftops in the Saini/Joyce book  The Australian House, mentioned previously in our research. The Wunderlich Company commenced trading in 1887 and was a hugely successful firm which by 1900 employed over 1000 workers – their products clearly evidence the creative skills of metalsmiths at this time.

By c1901 most of the household tinware was imported by larger retailing firms. The decorative Japanned ware was superceded by white enamelled items which provided a clean, practical surface for domestic use.

Gallery Artisan, Tinsmith: An ordinary romance Barbara Heath 7/10/2010–13/11/2010 – the flyer version finished today Tuesday, Aug 3 2010 

Even a brief survey of the trades required for the new colony of Queensland indicates a substantial number of tinsmiths were well established by 1874. Colonial tinsmiths worked tin plate with simple tools to produce basic household wares from pots and pans to tubs and buckets. Initially they followed the pioneers; supplying the needs of the miners, farmers and settlers as they journeyed to ever more remote areas. As towns and populations grew the tinsmith diversified and we find advertisements for roof guttering, ridge capping, spouting, baths and fittings of every description. Overlooked and undervalued, remnant work of the early Queensland tinsmiths, once so common, is now hard to find. By the late 1880’s even the evocative name of their trade began to fade as tin plate gave way to galvanised iron.

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