I’m impressed, Barbara has bought two large A2 prints and Max has given me copies of his two books Monday, Sep 15 2014 

I spent the morning with Max amongst his orchids and ferns at Kangaroo Point, Brisbane. Then into his folders of illustrator and photoshop files and his earlier workbooks, diaries and hand drawings. His web site has two books for sale that most of my contacts will simply want to have at home to adorn their library’s garden section; ‘the enchanted orchid’ and ‘striptease – It’s all done with flowers’. Both are beautifully post produced and printed on quality stocks, both are trimmed to 250mm H x 210mm W.

With ‘the enchanted orchid’ Max has designed, photographed and written this picture book that cleverly covers his chosen category. 144 pages drawn on to a folded laminated cover, first published in Sydney in 1999. Max has now done a second imprint co-published with Vanity House and his Cooroy Gardens entity in 2003 with a small number remaining from a very respectable second run. It sells for A$40.00 + postage of A$15.00

His ‘striptease – It’s all done with flowers’ was co-published later in 2005 with Vanity House and Cooroy Gardens also and is really a peek-aboo at his own marvellous story and talents with some generous take-aways for those interested in illustration, those with a handle on the Latin names for the floral species and those just looking for a great gift and read. It sells for A$25.00 + postage of A$15.00

 Again, Max is selling his remaining copies on-line so get in touch better still post him a cheque today <Max Fulcher 101/193 Main Street Kangaroo Point QLD 4169 Australia> and don’t forget to add your postal address. Repost this to your own blogs also.

 

My first boss came to morning tea in the studio last Thursday Saturday, Sep 13 2014 

In my holidays after my first year at art school, I spent six weeks at McWhirters in the Myer advertising department run by Max Fulcher. It might as well have been Madison Avenue because that tight little ship had most of the creative energy in Brisbane under the firm tutelage of Max and his team. I say tutelage because I actively learnt every job involved in the communication business, hands-on there in the next two years (1966 and 1967). I can still rattle off the names of the people working there who made such an impression on me – lots who years later I was pitching against for business in my own right. Max ran and trained the most creative enterprising division of Myer in the day, we were always being pushed by the Queensland chairman Harold Fielding to knock off the Melbourne team run by Wally O’Donohue. Not only did we achieve better advertising, better results for the group in Brisbane – Max delivered costs at a quarter of the price.

The world needs to know about this man from Yeronga’s meteoric rise to international retail success. Here in his own words to me, he explained his early grooming under Sir Kenneth Myer: ‘I introduced myself to Macy’s San Francisco where I met and began a working association with Duane McHolick who later came to Australia and set David Jones on a new promotional path “There is only one David Jones”. Studied with Mashall Fields (Chicago), The Broadway Stores (Los Angeles), Bonwitt Teller, Bloomingdales, Macy’s (New York). Myer supplied personal assistant and office in the New York Herald building. Introduced by Clyde Bedell (advertising guru who Myer sponsored to Australian in conjunction with Melbourne Herald around 1961) to Sek Seklemian (Retail Reporting Bureau – Retail Advertising Week) and wife and stayed in adjacent apartment  to them at the Barbizon Plaza 58th Street. Seklemian offered to sponsor me as his personal assistant (young Australians had good all-round training in advertising) if I decided to return to New York but loyalty to Myer prevailed. Holidayed in Nassau (Bahamas), returned to Macy’s (San Francisco) and was appointed Director Myer (Qld) upon return, June 1964.’

My own career couldn’t have started at a better time or a better place. Max’s sister Gem ran Camera Craft for Harry Poulsen at the time and she too was an active stimulus to my evolving fashion sense, Gem passed away recently and Max gave me this pic of her (left) and their friend Pat.

Like me, Max is an early adopter and his story of early digital times in Sydney is amazing – he started doing his own orchid illustrations after overcoming the vagaries of the Quark environment. Max lent me his catalogue of his first 108 personal illustrations, he has completed 111 to date. These are all layered vector elements created in Illustrator but more complex than that – he holds every shape he has ever created in folders at the same resolution so he can import and copy and place into new creations. He has a gallery relationship in Sydney but all our Australian Garden History Society friends should get in touch direct. My many interior design and architect friends should work with Max to enhance their hospitals and hotels with his exquisitely rendered digitally produced prints. Go direct here . . . A larger print of #11 that I like also. <max@maxfulcher.com> 0428198012

Two views of the Lady Franklin’s Greek Temple, one by Ricardo and one by mal E Tuesday, Sep 2 2014 

We made a late night pilgrimage this time that we were down in Tasmania. The Lady Franklin Museum, known as The Lady Franklin Gallery is a classical stone building in Lenah Valley. Built in 1842 as an art and historical museum, it was the creation of Lady Jane Franklin, the wife of Governor Sir John Franklin.

The Franklins were shocked at the lack of cultural institutions and the indifference of early colonists. Jane was an exceptionally resourceful and talented woman who envisaged and brought about the erection of a classical building along the lines of a Greek temple… to ensure the continuance of cultural aspirations of the future colony. When completed the Museum contained sculptures, books and pictures.

The Franklins left Hobart the following year and the building and 400acres of land was transferred upon trust to Christ College. By 1920 most of the land had been sold and the building was being used as an apple store and cow shed. In 1936 the property was transferred to the City Council, and in 1948 the Council accepted a proposal by The Art Society of Tasmania to lease the building as their Gallery. Open every weekend (Sat & Sun) except Easter and Christmas, shorter in the winter months.

You all might be interested to see the recycled gates created by Bob Dylan Friday, Aug 15 2014 

Dylan’s welded iron objects were shown late last year in London at Halycon and this review is from Barbara’s ‘metalsmith’ magazine which we were delighted to read. We have already installed a repaired metal strapped gate in Tunbridge, Tasmania and I have been collecting any scrap iron from the township since 2006.

My last big horde was from the ‘tunbridge wells inn’ – the town’s first dwelling which was once a blacksmith’s workshop. The previous owner Jack gave me all the scrap iron he found when cleaning up the property to put it on the market. We had always thought of recycling these pieces of the town for our own gates once we reside there proper. 

 

. . . we must mention the swapsies and the garden gifts from neighbours also Wednesday, Mar 5 2014 

Many meals have been made from produce gathered within a kilometre from the property, including lamb cuts and fish and mussels from the Blackman river. This little parcel was found outside the back door from Dot & Mike Evans who own the other two story sandstone building in the village.

The garden at Tunbridge is planted with heritage fruit trees that we have espaliered, now into their sixth year – they are bearing fruit. Wednesday, Mar 5 2014 

. . . and as we are tropical folk at heart, we are really grooving on jam and paste-making down there.

Here are x8 shots I took of the ‘silver’ objects when they were housed in the studio cabinet Monday, Nov 18 2013 

The show at the Museum of Brisbane opened last Thursday evening to a host of guests and many of our pals, all the artists and those closely associated with MOB. Marian has taken great individual shots of the objects on a white ground and the work itself shown with the backdrop looks super but here I am sharing eight of my more moody shots:

“Six pairs of Queensland’s finest visual  artist collaborate for the first time for ‘silver’. Each duo – a leading photographer and artisan jeweller – consider the differences and commonalities in their practices to present new artworks inspired by our city.” Barbara and Marian’s artist talk is at 2pm on Sunday 13th April 2014 just prior to the show’s closure on 27th April but don’t wait that long to see this super show . . .

Today was New Year’s Day in Ethiopia, but only to the year 2006 Wednesday, Sep 11 2013 

. . . everything you need to know is here – but the Ethiopian man who helps us with the garden handed in this solid gold ring he found in our garden ‘today’ . . . and it has crosses and is circular (so it will appear on ephemeral-male blog as well).

 

Friday at sunset – June 21 2013 we light our winter solstice fire in the backyard Thursday, Jun 20 2013 

foundsolstice2013

 

. . . we never know who will appear out of the shadows with their little pieces of paper for the fire.

Everything happens in twos it seems (inseparables), well Glenn Cooke owned the last post and yesterday he collected his latest two commissioned rings by Barbara Thursday, May 9 2013 

One of Barbara’s earliest sets of stacked interlocking rings was purchased at a Cintra House exhibition by Glenn Cooke, who was the decorative arts curator at the Queensland Art Gallery. ‘Cook-e’ has been a friend and supporter of us both and also we share many interests, Australiana: furniture and gold & silversmithing, chip art, tea towel art, matchstick art and found ephemera plus we are all members of the Australian Garden History Society. His third commission is featured today.

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