My first boss came to morning tea in the studio last Thursday Saturday, Sep 13 2014 

In my holidays after my first year at art school, I spent six weeks at McWhirters in the Myer advertising department run by Max Fulcher. It might as well have been Madison Avenue because that tight little ship had most of the creative energy in Brisbane under the firm tutelage of Max and his team. I say tutelage because I actively learnt every job involved in the communication business, hands-on there in the next two years (1966 and 1967). I can still rattle off the names of the people working there who made such an impression on me – lots who years later I was pitching against for business in my own right. Max ran and trained the most creative enterprising division of Myer in the day, we were always being pushed by the Queensland chairman Harold Fielding to knock off the Melbourne team run by Wally O’Donohue. Not only did we achieve better advertising, better results for the group in Brisbane – Max delivered costs at a quarter of the price.

The world needs to know about this man from Yeronga’s meteoric rise to international retail success. Here in his own words to me, he explained his early grooming under Sir Kenneth Myer: ‘I introduced myself to Macy’s San Francisco where I met and began a working association with Duane McHolick who later came to Australia and set David Jones on a new promotional path “There is only one David Jones”. Studied with Mashall Fields (Chicago), The Broadway Stores (Los Angeles), Bonwitt Teller, Bloomingdales, Macy’s (New York). Myer supplied personal assistant and office in the New York Herald building. Introduced by Clyde Bedell (advertising guru who Myer sponsored to Australian in conjunction with Melbourne Herald around 1961) to Sek Seklemian (Retail Reporting Bureau – Retail Advertising Week) and wife and stayed in adjacent apartment  to them at the Barbizon Plaza 58th Street. Seklemian offered to sponsor me as his personal assistant (young Australians had good all-round training in advertising) if I decided to return to New York but loyalty to Myer prevailed. Holidayed in Nassau (Bahamas), returned to Macy’s (San Francisco) and was appointed Director Myer (Qld) upon return, June 1964.’

My own career couldn’t have started at a better time or a better place. Max’s sister Gem ran Camera Craft for Harry Poulsen at the time and she too was an active stimulus to my evolving fashion sense, Gem passed away recently and Max gave me this pic of her (left) and their friend Pat.

Like me, Max is an early adopter and his story of early digital times in Sydney is amazing – he started doing his own orchid illustrations after overcoming the vagaries of the Quark environment. Max lent me his catalogue of his first 108 personal illustrations, he has completed 111 to date. These are all layered vector elements created in Illustrator but more complex than that – he holds every shape he has ever created in folders at the same resolution so he can import and copy and place into new creations. He has a gallery relationship in Sydney but all our Australian Garden History Society friends should get in touch direct. My many interior design and architect friends should work with Max to enhance their hospitals and hotels with his exquisitely rendered digitally produced prints. Go direct here . . . A larger print of #11 that I like also. <max@maxfulcher.com> 0428198012

Another carnelian intaglio ‘portrait’ seal – Jean-Jacques Rousseau Thursday, Sep 4 2014 

Sourced from Warwick Oakman Antiques in Battery Point, Hobart, this portrait seal of the great “citizen” philosopher whose writing influenced the French Revolution. I managed some text sleuthing and on the Gutenburg.org site where I found this very charming story recounting his early childhood, in Rousseau’s own words:

‘Every night, after supper, we read some part of a small collection of romances which had been my mother’s. My father’s design was only to improve me in reading, and he thought these entertaining works were calculated to give me a fondness for it; but we soon found ourselves so interested in the adventures they contained, that we alternately read whole nights together, and could not bear to give over until at the conclusion of a volume. Sometimes, in a morning, on hearing the swallows at our window, my father, quite ashamed of this weakness, would cry, “Come, come, let us go to bed; I am more a child than thou art.’

This piece is a welcome addition to our wonderful studio collection of seals, carved soft stones and writing paraphernalia.

Some links for those interested to delve further – gutenburg.comthe Stanford sitethe Wikipedia site.

More on our recent Tasmanian 10 day jaunt Tuesday, Sep 2 2014 

Overnight at the New Town Palace – Hobart shops – Burning off the summer garden’s waste – Reinstated the Georgian internal staircasePolished kitchen floor – Mr & Mrs Kissafish for lunch – Evandale relies drop in – Clockman, Warren & Babe – Unfruitful trip to Longford – Campbel Town shops – Two Profs from over the road drop in – Sunset on the river – Tracker gone – Rodney & Joey Kevin Joy Wishes Paul and Peter Simon – Quite a few perfect shots away – Gardening – Trip to the tip – Cracker drive to the airport in the MG ZT – and below the Peel-away project:

Two views of the Lady Franklin’s Greek Temple, one by Ricardo and one by mal E Tuesday, Sep 2 2014 

We made a late night pilgrimage this time that we were down in Tasmania. The Lady Franklin Museum, known as The Lady Franklin Gallery is a classical stone building in Lenah Valley. Built in 1842 as an art and historical museum, it was the creation of Lady Jane Franklin, the wife of Governor Sir John Franklin.

The Franklins were shocked at the lack of cultural institutions and the indifference of early colonists. Jane was an exceptionally resourceful and talented woman who envisaged and brought about the erection of a classical building along the lines of a Greek temple… to ensure the continuance of cultural aspirations of the future colony. When completed the Museum contained sculptures, books and pictures.

The Franklins left Hobart the following year and the building and 400acres of land was transferred upon trust to Christ College. By 1920 most of the land had been sold and the building was being used as an apple store and cow shed. In 1936 the property was transferred to the City Council, and in 1948 the Council accepted a proposal by The Art Society of Tasmania to lease the building as their Gallery. Open every weekend (Sat & Sun) except Easter and Christmas, shorter in the winter months.

You all might be interested to see the recycled gates created by Bob Dylan Friday, Aug 15 2014 

Dylan’s welded iron objects were shown late last year in London at Halycon and this review is from Barbara’s ‘metalsmith’ magazine which we were delighted to read. We have already installed a repaired metal strapped gate in Tunbridge, Tasmania and I have been collecting any scrap iron from the township since 2006.

My last big horde was from the ‘tunbridge wells inn’ – the town’s first dwelling which was once a blacksmith’s workshop. The previous owner Jack gave me all the scrap iron he found when cleaning up the property to put it on the market. We had always thought of recycling these pieces of the town for our own gates once we reside there proper. 

 

Thinking about the state of Susie Hansen’s mural at La Trobe Terrace Paddington Wednesday, Jul 30 2014 

Plants are now trailing down from the top and lichen is now covering a great mass of the paintwork.

I have posted on this before and recently it has been up on FaceBook with comments and suggestions that we should all create a working bee and “clean it up”, what do you think Susie? . . . what does HandsOnArt think?

Barbara’s 60th at the house was a ‘love-in’ thats for sure Tuesday, Jul 22 2014 

It started with her surprise present – a black (but very green) pony. Lil and Barb on Saturday morning, below.

I arranged the catering and Lil did the champagne for a small group of forty closest friends. I asked Jane Grigg to shoot everyone in attendance but we still haven’t been presented with the shots as yet. Fantastic shots posted by Sheridan and Jacqueline on FaceBook, thanks to everyone! 5–8pm was the plan, 1:30am we were all danced out . . . quite a few can’t remember how they got home! A second pony present – an artwork by Dr Deborah Porch, below.

Here is my 65th birthday movie Monday, Jul 7 2014 

A great Saturday – Love and thanks to everyone responsible for heart felt messages!

http://www.co-opones.to/male/viewer/images/Feb2014/malE-65today.mov

An artist and gallerist purchased the latest Housegeister we sold at St Matgaret’s Mayo Festival Tuesday, Jun 10 2014 

Michael Eather has been making his art for over 30 years now and we once shared the same dealer – Michael Milburn so we have been mates since then. His own gallery – Fireworks Gallery shows a miriad of indigenous and non-indigenous artists side by side with a spread of senior to emerging artists from all over Australia.

We are always excited when a piece goes to a good place, person or collection, in this case it goes to all three and what’s more Michael ‘gets it’ . . . these ‘Tinsmithed objects” were covered in Inside-Outside magazine at the time of the first Artisan show, for those new readers here are the two downloadable pages – onetwo. I’ll post a smaller pic of page two , below.

Barbara scored another hankie, this time from my ‘graphics’ files at Urban _Archaeology Sunday, May 4 2014 

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